SUPERFOOD SERIES: Bok Choy

Posted by on 25th April 2017

DSC 9021  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Bok Choy

Bok choy is in the “leafy green” vegetable category. We know it’s good for us, so then why does this versatile food with a satisfying crunch get overlooked on the supermarket shelf more often than not?

Partly because our creative flair tends to hit a brick wall when it comes to thinking of imaginative and tasty ways to prepare and cook this low-calories vegetable rather than just the humble steam or fry (also both delicious options)!

The key is to find local, quality bok choy, that is packed with plenty of flavour and nutrients. The second tip is to prepare simply with few ingredients so that fresh bok choy remains the hero of the dish.

Did you know that bok choy and other cruciferous vegetables have certain anti-cancer properties? Studies have shown that people who eat more cruciferous vegetables have a lower risk of developing lung, prostate, colon, and breast cancer.

The iron, phosphorous, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and vitamin K in bok choy all contribute to building and maintaining bone structure and strength.

The potassium, calcium, and magnesium have also been found to decrease blood pressure naturally and bok choy’s folate, potassium, vitamin C and vitamin B-6 content, coupled with its lack of cholesterol, all help to maintain a healthy heart.

Choline helps with sleep, muscle movement, learning, and memory. It also helps in maintaining the structure of cellular membranes, the transmission of nerve impulses, the absorption of fat and the reduction of chronic inflammation.

Increasing consumption of plant foods, including bok choy, has been shown to decrease the risk of obesity, diabetes and heart disease, while promoting a healthy complexion and hair, increased energy and overall lower weight.

Bok choy might look like celery but it is a member of the cabbage family. There are many kinds of bok choy that vary in colour, taste and size, including tah tsai and joi choi. You might also find bok choy spelled pak choi, bok choi, or pak chou. It’s sometimes even called a “soup spoon” because of the shape of its leaves.

The Chinese have been cultivating the vegetable for more than 5,000 years and the translation of the Cantonese words ‘bok choy’ is ‘white vegetable’ in English.

For a fresh and tasty take on this Asian green, come and try Chef Thomas’s mouthwatering ‘Crispy Triggerfish Sandwich’ now on The Brasserie menu.

CHEF THOMAS’ CRISPY TRIGGERFISH SANDWICH

Ingredients

1 fillet triggerfish, lightly crumbed and fried
bok choy, shredded
carrots, julienne
pickles
shallots, crispy
tartare sauce
slice of toasted bread
lime, wedge

Method

Dollop tartare on the toasted bread and then layer the pickles and shallots. Place the fish on top and finish with a large mound of refreshing carrot and bok choy. Drizzle lime juice over and enjoy.

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