Tag: cooking class

April in Cricket Square

Posted by on 5th April 2017

Spring has Sprung at Cricket Square

Cocktail King Dinner: 7pm, Friday 28 April

Shake, rattle and roll! Cocktail extraordinaire Gregory Genias, aka “Bootleg Greg“, will be shaking up a storm at our Cocktail Extravaganza with Brasserie Purveyors’ spirits at the Restaurant. Enjoy a welcome cocktail and canapés on arrival, followed by a four course cocktail-paired dinner for CI$100 (incl. grats). For an entertaining evening book here.

Final Harvest Dinner for this series

Don’t miss our last Harvest Dinner until November! Join us at 7pm on Thursday 27 April for this unique farm-to-table experience where our talented chefs from Mexico will be adding their unique home town flavours to the best of our end of season harvest. Enjoy with wine pairings for CI$90 (incl. grats). Hurry and book your seat at the table.

End of series Cooking Class

Our final Cooking Class for the series is on Sunday 30 April. Learn tips and tricks in the kitchen with our experienced chefs Dean Max and Thomas Tennant. Create your own flavoursome three-course feast using fresh and seasonal produce. Our March class sold out quickly so book early to avoid disappointment. Classes will resume October 2017.

Easter sweet treats at The Market

Our Pastry Chef’s Easter treats will be sold at The Market from Monday 10 – Thursday 13 April. Enjoy mouthwatering Hot Cross Buns, Easter Sugar Cookies and Peanut Butter Cup Truffles. The RestaurantMarket and Juiced@ The Wicket will be closed on Good Friday (14 April) and Easter Monday (17 April). We are open on Tuesday 18 April.

SWIRL: 5-7pm, Thursday 20 April

Dijon mustard, beef bourguignon and Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes. How many culinary delights can one region be famous for? The French region of Burgundy can proudly claim all. Burgundy wines are believed to be some of the greatest in the world, so join us to find out what all the fuss is about. SWIRL tickets are CI$30 (incl. grats). Email Corey to book.

Free juice at Juiced @ The Wicket

Buy 10 juices or smoothies from our delicious menu and get one FREE. Collect your Juiced @ card from Sharon at The Wicket and reward yourself with a healthy and delicious treat from our extensive menu that incorporates the freshest seasonal produce on island. In a hurry? Call 927 6419 and order ahead.

Earth Day: Saturday 22 April

Bring your reusable travel mug to The Market for FREE drip coffee all day. While you’re there grab a bag of coffee grounds from our wheelbarrow to add to your garden soil. The coffee will release nitrogen, potassium and phosphorous to support plant growth. Also collect some of our mutton pepper seedlings and together, let’s bring back the Cayman pepper!

Power Pilates Bootcamp at Energy

Get ready for eight total body blasting Pilates Reformer classes and four Group Fitness classes for $225. Choose from Group A (Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30-7:15am) or Group B (Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1-1:45pm). ENERGY’s next Power Pilates Bootcamp starts on Tuesday 4 April and runs for four weeks. Contact Colleen to register.

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Breadfruit

Posted by on 20th March 2017

Have you ever wondered what the inside of a breadfruit looks like? The image above was taken during our last cooking class at The Brasserie when we were learning how to make deliciously satisfying breadfruit chips.

This dimply bright green orb the size of a cantaloupe has always created interest and intrigue. Why now for a breadfruit comeback? It’s high in fibre, antioxidants, calcium, iron and potassium.

The other great news is that you can eat breadfruit at any stage. When it’s small and green, it tastes like an artichoke. When it’s starchy and mature, breadfruit is the equivalent of a potato. When it’s soft and ripe, it’s dessert.

A traditional staple in Hawaii, breadfruit is sometimes called the tree potato, for its potato-like consistency when cooked. Except breadfruit has higher-quality protein and packs a healthy dose of vitamins and minerals.

That’s why this nutrient-rich staple is being cultivated for poorer, tropical parts of the world, giving us even more reasons to consider breadfruit as a superfood. The fast-growing perennial trees require far less labour, fertiliser and pesticides than crops like rice and wheat. They’re also more productive. A single tree yields an average of 250 fruits a year and can bear an abundance of fruit for decades.

Breadfruit grows on tall trees in tropical areas like Hawaii, Samoa, and the Caribbean. It’s high in energy from carbohydrates, low in fat and has more potassium than 10 bananas.

This fruit is an immune booster and is rich in amino acids that are essential to keeping our bodies fueled and functioning properly. It’s loaded with bioflavonoids, which fight inflammation, and contains high levels of thiamine to support digestive health.

So the next time you see breadfruit on our menu, enjoy this superfood, knowing that it is providing your body with plenty of nourishment.

CHEF THOMAS’ FAMOUS BREADFRUIT SALAD
8 servings

Ingredients

2 breadfruit
½ cup seasoning pepper aioli
3 green onions, trimmed, washed, thinly sliced
3 local bell peppers, diced
1 scotch bonnet, seeds removed, minced
4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
½ cup sour cream
3 tablespoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon black pepper
kosher salt
5 beets, trimmed of any tops

Method

Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Cut the top of the breadfruit off and score the bottom with an “x”. Roast on a sheet pan for about 35-45 minutes or until you can insert a knife easily into the centre. Once cooked remove from the oven and allow to cool. Peel the skin by cutting with a knife. Dice the breadfruit into 1 inch cubes. Combine the aioli, green onion, peppers, scotch bonnet, vinegar, sour cream, salt and pepper in a mixing bowl and whisk until combined. Stir in the breadfruit. Season to taste. Meanwhile, pour about 1 cup of kosher salt into a baking dish and place the beet on the salt. Roast in the oven at 350 degrees until cooked though. Allow to cool and peel. Slice thinly and reserve for plating.

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Green papaya

Posted by on 14th March 2017

Green Papaya Salad  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Green papaya

Deliciously sweet with a soft, butter-like consistency, it’s no wonder that Christopher Columbus called the papaya the “fruit of the angels”.

Bright colorful mountains of green papaya salad, laden with fresh tomato, garden cucumber and green beans and topped with crispy local breadfruit, peanuts and herbs, is one of our favourite seasonal salads.

Papaya (referred to as pawpaw in Australia) is native to southern Mexico and Central America and is now cultivated in many tropical regions. You could be mistaken for thinking papaya is grown on a tree, however it’s really a large herb with a tall barkless and branchless trunk crowned by a shock of large leaves.

Green papaya is the unripe fruit and contains an enzyme called papain that helps digest proteins and is used as a natural meat tenderiser. Papaya seeds have a peppery taste and are a great substitute for black peppercorns.

Papaya is a rich source of vitamin C and contains beta-carotene, minerals and dietary fibre. If kale no longer does the trick to cleanse you out, it might be time to add this superfood, super-fruit to your repertoire thanks to its fibre content and natural laxative abilities, as well as enzymes that help with balancing stomach acid for healthy digestion.

Though very different in taste, texture, and appearance, green and orange papaya are actually the same fruit picked at different stages of development. The tender, creamy, orange-fleshed papaya is harvested when fully mature. It’s sweet, “melon-y” and even somewhat “cheesy.” Because it is very low in acid, it is often spritzed with lime juice to provide balance. Immature green papaya has crisp white flesh with subtle flavour. It is prized mostly for its crunch and used primarily as a base for salads. Green papaya is “clean-tasting” and “like cucumber or jicama”; in fact jicama (Mexican turnip) and seeded cucumber make good substitutes if green papaya is unavailable.

 

GREEN PAPAYA SALAD
Serves 4-6

Ingredients

Dressing
2 garlic cloves, peeled
¼ teaspoon salt
2 fresh bird’s eye chili, sliced
½ teaspoon raw sugar
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons fish sauce, to taste

2 cups julienned peeled green (unripe) papaya
2 cups julienned peeled cucumber
1 cups julienned peeled carrots
2 plum tomatoes
8 grape tomatoes, coarsely chopped
½ pound long beans, trimmed

½ cup loosely packed fresh Thai basil leaves
½ cup loosely packed fresh Vietnamese mint (rau ram) leaves
½ cup loosely packed fresh coriander leaves
breadfruit, sliced thinly and fried
1 tablespoon dry-roasted peanuts, for garnish

Method
Mix all dressing ingredients together. Combine prepared salad produce, top with the dressing and sprinkle with a mixture of the herbs, breadfruit strips and nuts.

Swordfish surprise just weeks out from Challenge

Posted by on 9th March 2017

Imagine dropping a line in the water expecting to catch a snapper and you instead haul up a 270-pound and approximately 10-foot long swordfish. Lewis Wood and his son Malik found themselves in this position 12 days ago about five miles off the coast of Frank Sound, Grand Cayman.

Just two weeks out from the Cayman Swordfish Challenge, the catch was timely, emphasizing the thriving fishery that exists in the local waters.

“This is the first swordfish that I have ever caught,” exclaimed Lewis. “We visit this fishing spot every weekend. It’s right on my backdoor.”

“It was our first drop of the day”, said Malik.

“Normally when we deep drop for snapper we add a plastic leader spliced to the braid as a shock leader “top shot” so it gives a scope when you drop your snapper rig. This allows our snapper rig to lie on the bottom of the ocean giving us an even greater chance to get bites.

“In this instance, I decided to just use straight braided line and luckily we did, otherwise the line wouldn’t have been able to hold the swordfish.”

Within seconds of the line hitting the ocean floor some 430 meters down, Malik felt a sharp pull on the reel.

“It felt like a shark,” he said.

Malik described the line instantly going slack as he began reeling it in.

“I thought that whatever was on the line had broken off, when in fact the swordfish was actually swimming straight up to the surface. Rather than getting hooked, the fish had managed to tangle itself in the line as if it had swum straight into it.”

Three hours later Lewis and Mailk were lifting the swordfish into their 18-foot boat, but not without a fight.

“I had never seen a live swordfish before and when it came to the surface I couldn’t believe it,” Malik said.

“As soon as the fish saw us it quickly swam straight down to about 60 meters. I started reeling it back in with our electric reel and suddenly its entire bill came up out of the water at the bow of the boat.”

The swordfish headed for the ocean floor again and this time didn’t stop until the fishermen were almost to the end of their line.

“We have 467 meters of line on our electric reel and at this point we only had 20 meters of line left! We thought we were going to run out. I gently put my gloved hand on the reel to slow down the pace of the fish, and it responded.”

Lewis and Malik decided to work with the fish rather than against it. “We gently dragged the swordfish heading in the same direction as the ocean current and turned the boat to wind up slack with the electric reel.”

After several hours, their tactic finally prevailed.

So, if you have been enjoying our delicious swordfish dishes at The Brasserie over the last week you have father and son, Lewis and Malik Wood, to thank for their mighty effort out on the water that day.

The tips and tricks to making tasty Jerk marinade

Posted by on 6th March 2017

IMG 3480 1  The tips and tricks to making tasty Jerk marinade

Have you ever made your own jerk marinade? How many ways can you eat conch? What does breadfruit look like on the inside? Do you know what black sapote is? Have you tasted roasted tomato aioli? Do you want to learn the tips and tricks to smoking fish? Welcome to this month’s Cooking Class!

**

The fresh conch in their shells wait at the kitchen door as the final ingredients for our March cooking class are harvested from The Brasserie garden.

Locally caught swordfish marinated in housemade jerk flavors matched with caboose roasted Cayman breadfruit and coconut turmeric conch sauce is on the menu, giving guests an insight into local tradition and cuisine passed down through the generations, when recipes and techniques were kept secret and competition and pride ran high among jerk cooks.

Ask a local what the work jerk means and they’ll tell you that it refers to the motion in either turning the meat in the marinade or over burning coals. The term jerk is said to come from the word charqui, a Spanish term for jerked or dried meat, which eventually became the word jerky in English. Jerk is also derived from the action of jerking or poking the meat with holes so that the flavor can be more easily absorbed.

Jerk has been served on Caribbean tables for hundreds of years, traditionally Jamaican Jerk was a method of cooking pork. A unique blend of seasonings including scallions, onions, scotch bonnet peppers (that gives jerk its spiciness), salt, thyme, allspice (Jamaican pimento) and black pepper, all ingredients are grown on the islands’ fertile soils. Chef Thomas shares his nifty trick of grilling the scallions and onions until charred for extra flavor.

There are gasps of surprise as our Pastry Chef, Christine, hands around the pureed black sapote, a species of persimmon, ready to whisk into the other mouthwatering panna cotta ingredients. Also know as “chocolate pudding fruit” (sounds delicious right?) the fruit flesh is rich, dark chocolate in color with a custard-like consistency and even tastes like mild chocolate without the calories. A boost for your immune system, black sapote is rich in antioxidants and vitamin C.

Laughs, surprises and lots of taste testing involved!

Want to be part of our final Cooking Class for the series being held on Sunday 30 April? Email us to book your spot: reservations@brasseriecayman.com