Tag: cooking class

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Cumin

Posted by on 8th October 2018

What is cumin and how do you pronounce it?

Cumin (KYOO-men) is herbaceous plant that grows from 12 to 20 inches in height and produces single-seeded fruit, oblong-shaped and yellow-brown coloured. Hold the seeds to your nose and you’ll smell a strong, earthy aroma.

The second most popular spice in the world (black pepper is number one) is one of the star ingredients in Chef Erik’s ‘Caboose Pork Rub’.

Cumin is extremely good for treating digestive problems. It is also a carminative, which means that it relieves you from gas troubles, and thereby, improves digestion and appetite. Due to its essential oils, magnesium, and sodium content, cumin promotes digestion and also gives relief from stomachaches when taken with hot water. The very aroma, which comes from an organic compound called cuminaldehyde, the main component of its essential oil, activates the salivary glands in the mouth, which facilitates the primary digestion of food. Next is thymol, a compound present in cumin, which stimulates the glands that secrete acids, bile, and enzymes responsible for complete digestion of the food in the stomach and intestines.

An abundance of iron, the presence of essential oils, vitamin C, and vitamin A in cumin boosts our immune system in a number of ways. Vitamin C is one of the most powerful antioxidants that stimulate the function and activity of white blood cells. It further helps neutralise free radicals that lead to many diseases, including, but not limited to, cardiovascular diseases.

Cumin is a rich source of iron which helps in increasing hemoglobin levels, improving blood flow and also promoting a healthy menstrual cycle.

The presence of caffeine (a stimulating agent), and the richly aromatic essential oils (the disinfectants) make cumin an ideal anti-congestive combination for those suffering from respiratory disorders such as asthma and bronchitis. It acts as an expectorant, meaning that it loosens up the accumulated phlegm and mucus in the respiratory tracts, and makes it easier to eliminate them from the system via sneezing or coughing up and spitting. By eliminating as much of the mucus and phlegm as possible, it can inhibit the formation of additional material and help heal the initial condition that led to its formation in the first place.

Cumin helps in protecting skin against fungal and microbial infections due to its disinfectant and antifungal properties. It also aids in reducing signs of premature aging like wrinkles, age spots, and sagging skin. This effect is due to the presence of vitamin E, which acts as an antioxidant and combats the free radicals.

A stimulant as well as a relaxant, some of the components in cumin essential oil are hypnotic in nature and have tranquilising effects, which also help relieve stress and anxiety that commonly cause insomnia.

Cumin extracts have anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties that help in relieving pain and inflammation associated with arthritis.

Time for a taste! Head on over to the Caboose and speak to Chef Erik about his delicious pork ribs and pulled pork on the menu, as well as his pork rub containing cumin, available for purchase in cute litter jars at the counter (see below).

DSC 4725  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Cumin

 

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Strawberries

Posted by on 14th September 2018

johnny martinez 265702 unsplash  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Strawberries

Strawberries have a lot of love to give. Firstly, they are heart-shaped, and secondly, sweet, juicy and make you feel good on the inside and out.

Strawberries are an excellent source of vitamins C and K as well as providing a good dose of fibre, folic acid, manganese and potassium. They also contain significant amounts of phytonutrients and flavanoids which makes strawberries bright red.

Used throughout history in a medicinal context, strawberries can help with digestive ailments, teeth whitening and skin irritations. Their fibre and fructose content may help regulate blood sugar levels by slowing digestion and the fibre is thought to have a satiating effect.

The antioxidant properties in strawberries may also help to prevent cataracts – the clouding over of the eye lens – which can lead to blindness in older age. Our eyes require vitamin C to protect them from exposure to free-radicals from the sun’s harsh UV rays, which can damage the protein in the lens. Vitamin C also plays an important role in strengthening the eye’s cornea and retina.

Vitamin C is one of the antioxidants that can help with cancer prevention, since a healthy immune system is the body’s best defense. A phytochemical called ellagic acid – also found in strawberries – is another.

The power of vitamin C in strawberries continues, as it is vital to the production of collagen, which helps to improve skin’s elasticity and resilience. Since we lose collagen as we age, eating foods rich in vitamin C may result in healthier, younger-looking skin.

The antioxidants and phytochemicals found in strawberries may also help to reduce inflammation of the joints, which may cause arthritis and can also lead to heart disease.

Did you know that strawberries are not actually fruits, as their seeds are on the outside (an average of 200 seeds per fruit). Each “seed” is technically a separate fruit that has a seed inside of it. Despite all this confusion about strawberry seeds, most strawberries are not actually grown from seeds! As strawberry plants grow, they send out thin growths called “runners”. These runners look like strings. When they reach the ground, they send roots into the soil. The roots produce new strawberry plants.

So how did the strawberry get its name? No one knows for sure, but there are a few ideas of how the name might have come about. Some believe that English children in the 19th century would pick strawberries and string them on grass straws to sell as “straws of berries.” Others think the name came from the practice of placing straw around the plants to protect them from the weather. Most people, however, believe “strawberry” came from “strewn berry” since strawberries appear to be “strewn” about on the plants where they grow.

However what really matters is that taste good and are available throughout the Juiced @ The Wicket menu and the Market and Restaurant dessert menus.

DSC 4492  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Strawberries

THE PITCH: September in Cricket Square

Posted by on 3rd September 2018

As the summer season draws to an end, Cricket Square comes back to life with new purpose. Check out what’s on offer.

The Brasserie is open

THE BRASSERIE — Did you miss us? After a month of rest and revamp, the doors to The Brasserie Restaurant have reopened with delicious new culinary surprises up our chef’s sleeves! The staff are ready to welcome you from 11:30am – 10pm weekdays, so make a reservation for lunch, cocktails or dinner and get prepared for an exciting winter events season ahead!

SWIRL: 5pm-7pm, Thursday 20 September

THE BRASSERIE — Don’t let your next bottle of wine be a gamble. Taste the heart and soul of four internationally-recognised Oregon and Washington wines at this month’s exclusive SWIRL event. From ground to glass, we’ll showcase highlights from the Pacific Northwest – both states ranked in the top four wine regions in the United States. Oregon and Washington boast steady, reliable climates that yield consistent wines in both flavour and vintage. Find your next dependable wine at our upcoming SWIRL and receive 10% off all purchases. Call 945-1815 or email us to book!

The Big Shave: Friday 28 September

WICKET BAR — The sixth annual Hannah’s Heroes ‘The Big Shave’ is on Friday 28 September 2018. Join us at the Wicket Bar to be part of an inspirational cause that will benefit so many. Whether you opt for a new hairstyle, donate or volunteer, you’ll be helping change the lives of children battling cancer. For more information, contact the team at Hannah’s Heroes.

Celebrate Christmas at Cricket Square

THE BRASSERIE — Beginning to feel a lot like Christmas? As we head into “winter” and the home run to the festive season, look no further than The Brasserie to host your Christmas celebrations with loved ones, colleagues and friends. We have spectacular set menus with extensive cocktail and fine wine lists to match. Contact our elves to reserve your preferred date.

Brasserie Bee honey available the Market

THE BRASSERIE — Have you tasted The Brasserie’s wild and raw honey or honeycomb? Did you know that we sell jars of our Brasserie Bee honey at the Market? Indulge in this sweet treat for yourself or gift to family and friends and keep everyone happy. Located on the shelf next to the baked goods, alongside our house-made jams and chutneys, you don’t have to go far to find meaningful presents. Watch the Brasserie Bee Series here.

US Open live at the Wicket Bar

WICKET BAR — What is summer without the Grand Slam tennis tournaments? Join us from 11am this week at the Wicket Bar for live coverage of the US Open. Enjoy Happy Hour prices and celebrate the 50th anniversary of this exciting tournament with us at Cricket Square.

Takeaway delicious BBQ at the Caboose

THE CABOOSE — Did you know that you can takeaway all items on our Caboose menu? If your fridge is empty and you’re in a hurry to get home after work, stop by the Caboose in Cricket Square for all your dinner needs. Choose from our large selection of quality meats, naturally-raised and without hormones and pesticides, as well as healthy vegetable sides. Open until 6pm weekdays. Call 945-1816 to order ahead, pay over the phone, then pull up curbside and we’ll bring your food to you.

Juiced @ The Wicket weekly specials

WICKET BAR — Enjoy our $5 Juiced @ The Wicket special each week using the seasonal ingredients of Cayman in our nourishing, nutritious, energising and refreshing concoctions that will make you and your wallet feel good. Our specials don’t often feature on the regular Juiced @ menu, so make the most of this sweet opportunity. Call 927 6419 to order ahead.

ENERGY celebrates 15th Anniversary

ENERGY — Celebrate 15 wonderful years of ENERGY with a Total Body Class Pass. For $325 per person, all inclusive, receive 7 weeks of exclusive studio access, classes, wellness gifts and more. Join the Group Pilates, Barre, Yoga, TRX, Core Cardio Circuit, ENERGY X-Training and ENERGY Lunch Express Classes and move one step closer to completing the ENERGY15th Anniversary Challenge and winning some incredible prizes!

Eat, drink and be scary at The Brasserie

THE BRASSERIE — On Wednesday 31 October, The Brasserie will be “witching” you a very happy Halloween with our famous pumpkin carving competition, Halloween-themed cocktails and spooky baked treats available at the Market from Monday 29 October. Call 945-1814 to order ahead. Franken-tastic!

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Basil

Posted by on 13th August 2018

stephanie studer 507123 unsplash  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Basil

Did you know there are actually 35 different types of basil?

Basil contains antioxidant-rich volatile essential oils, which are considered hydrophobic. This means they don’t dissolve in water and are light and small enough to travel through the air and the pores within our skin. Basil’s volatile essential oils are what give the herb its distinct smell and taste, but they’re also responsible for the healing benefits of basil.

Herbs like basil contain essential oil compounds because these help the plant defend itself from predators like bugs, rodents and strains of bacteria in the soil. When we ingest these protective oils, we experience similar benefits: a boost in immunity and protection from disease.

Basil contains powerful essential oils, including eugenol, citronellol and linalool. These are enzyme-inhibiting oils that help lower inflammation, which is at the root of most diseases like heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel conditions.

Basil is a powerful antioxidant. It’s full of polyphenolic flavonoids, which shield much of the body’s structures from cell-damaging free radicals. Free radicals can cause a lot of problems such as oxidising cholesterol in your bloodstream, where it builds up in your arteries and raises your risk of stroke and heart attack. Asthma, certain types of arthritis, and several other ailments can also be attributed to free radicals.

As a good source of magnesium, basil promotes blood flow. As a good source of vitamin A it promotes healthy eyesight, and because of eugenol (a major component of the oil produced by basil leaves) it has also been shown to be an effective anti-inflammatory in the same vein as aspirin and ibuprofen.

Basil is an excellent source of vitamin K, manganese, iron, vitamin A, and vitamin C. It’s also a good source of calcium, magnesium, and omega-3 fatty acids.

Did you also know that basil extract is also used to create perfumes, household cleaners and in dental-care products since one of the known benefits of basil is its ability to act as an anti-bacterial and anti-microbial agent that fights germs and bacteria?

Basil essential oil is commonly used in aromatherapy to treat nervous tension, mental fatigue, melancholy, migraines and depression, and – fortunately – to treat certain symptoms of these ailments, including vomiting and nausea.

So next time you go out for a nice meal at your local Italian or Thai restaurant – or pretty much anyplace where the cuisine incorporates basil into its dishes – just remember: It’s OK to feel a little less guilty about whatever it is that you eat. Basil, after all, has got your back.

micheile henderson 597886 unsplash  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Basil

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Honeydew melon

Posted by on 13th August 2018

hoenydew melon  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Honeydew melon

Honeydew melon is one of the fruits that come to mind when looking for a sweet and refreshing treat on a hot summer day.

This fruit, with its smooth yellow rind and pale green flesh, boasts high nutritional content. From vitamin B to zinc, every bite of this fruit is packed with various vitamins and minerals.

Honeydew is made up of 90 percent water, which is why it can quench your thirst and keep the body hydrated on a hot summer day. Plus, it contains a good amount of potassium, which helps maintain the water level in your body by countering your sodium intake.

A great source of vitamin C, this melon plays an important role in the production of collagen in your body. Collagen can repair and nourish not just your skin but also your hair and nails. The vitamin C in honeydew also helps boost your immune system to fight off bacteria and illnesses.

Honeydew is beneficial for people who are suffering from hypertension, as it has a high potassium content that can help prevent blood elevation.

Your eyes will thank you for including honeydew in your diet because it contains lutein and zeaxanthin — these are important phytonutrients that help maintain eye health and reduce eye disorders.

Honeydew is rich in calcium, helping your body maintain and improve bone health. It also keeps your teeth healthy and strong.

A low calorie content, means that honeydew is a perfect fruit snack for people who are trying to lose weight. It’s also rich in fibre that can aid in food digestion.

Did you know that the ancient Egyptians regarded the honeydew as sacred and it was only reserved for society’s elite? So next time you devour the succulent, sweet, green flesh of the honeydew, remember to savour every bite.

On a side note, the sweetness and flavour of the honeydew goes well with cottage cheese, sweet cream, mint or lime. The flavours of summer!

honeydew slices  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Honeydew melon