Tag: cooking class

THE PITCH: June in Cricket Square

Posted by on 1st June 2018

An incredible milestone is recognised this month as we come together to celebrate 20 glorious years of The Brasserie.

20th Anniversary Gala Dinner

THE BRASSERIE — Can you name The Brasserie’s past chefs over our 20 years in operation? Remember Brad, Niven, Greg, Joe, Pushkar and Thomas? Come and say hi to all our amazing chefs, past and present, who have helped The Brasserie become a culinary fixture in Cayman at our 20th Anniversary Gala. You know they’ll be trying to outdo each other! Celebrations start at 6pm on Sunday 17 June. The perfect once-in-a-lifetime Father’s Day gift. Tickets are CI$200 excl. grats. Call 945-1815 or email.

Kids Culinary Summer 2018

THE BRASSERIE — Summer vacation is the time to reconnect and relax with family, to recreate favourite childhood memories and to make new ones together. This summer we are excited to announce that The Brasserie will be offering fortnightly interactive farm-to-table culinary tours for children in June and July! Our Chef de Cuisine and Head Gardener will offer tours with the children around the organic vegetable garden, show them the fresh catch when it comes in from the boats and collect eggs from the on-site chooks. Call 945-1815 or email to book.

SWIRL: 5-7pm, Thursday 28 June

THE BRASSERIE — Rosé wines are not about chick appeal; they are chic in their own right. They are more than a simple apéritif, being excellent food partners; for alfresco dining, summer picnics and BBQ’s. Discover the craft of making rosé and its many refreshing qualities. Who says that summer has to end? Join us to see the world through pink-tinted lenses! Enjoy four wines paired with delicious canapés. Tickets are CI$30. Email or call 945-1815.

FIFA World Cup live at the Wicket Bar

WICKET BAR — Who’s ready for the 2018 FIFA World Cup starting Thursday 14 June? Enjoy all the live action from Russia, right here, at the Wicket Bar while savouring our thirst-quenching Juiced @ menu or craft beer on tap. Click here for the match schedule and don’t miss a second of the action! Take a break from work and make the most of our live coverage of the FIFA World Cup.

FREE juice at Juiced @ The Wicket

WICKET BAR — Buy 10 juices or smoothies from our delicious menuand get one FREE. Collect your Juiced @ card from Sharon at The Wicket and reward yourself with a healthy and delicious treat from our extensive menu that incorporates the freshest seasonal produce on island. In a hurry? Call 927 6419 and order ahead. And don’t forget Happy Hour is every Friday, 5pm.

Flowers Sea Swim: 16 June 2018

SEVEN MILE BEACH — The Flowers Sea Swim swims into its 26th year and is the world’s richest open water event with over $100,000 in cash and prizes. Last event’s race boasted over 1000 registrants. Participants vary in age from 8 to 80 years old and in skill from novices and first-timers to gold medal Olympians. This fun event welcomes swimmers from all strokes of life! Register here.

Get summer ready with ENERGY Intensity

ENERGY — Get ready for summer with the ultimate HIIT workout! ENERGY Intensity will blast your body with High Intensity Interval Training and then stretch and strengthen it with flexibility and core work. Join coach, Emiley, this month on Mondays and Wednesdays from 6:15-7:00am. Book your four extra bonus ENERGY group fitness classes here. Twelve amazing workouts for only $199! Space is limited so register early to save your spot in this new ENERGY experience!

Restaurant annual closing for August

THE BRASSERIE — The Brasserie Restaurant will close on Tuesday 31 July (Happy Hour prices all day!) and reopen on Monday 3 September. We apologise for any inconvenience and hope that you will continue to come and visit us at the Market, the Caboose, Juiced @ The Wicket and Happy Hour on Fridays at the Wicket Bar. These venues will be staying open during the month of August.

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Sweet potato

Posted by on 14th May 2018

brasserie cayman 2  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Sweet potato

Sweet potato, the root vegetable once used to feed the poor in the early 20th century, is back in fashion, which is good news as it is one of the world’s best superfoods and contains a bunch of nutrients you can’t go past for health benefits.

Here at The Brasserie we are producing our own crop for the Restaurant menu, complete with sweet potato leaves that are extremely nutritional and tasty in their own right. See this week’s Today’s Harvest post on our Facebook page for growing tips.

Antioxidants found in food are natural anti-inflammatory agents, and sweet potatoes are full of them! Vitamins from the B family in abundance, like C and A, sweet potatoes are also a good source of choline, which is usually mostly found in meat and eggs. Choline is very important to tame inflammation, but it is also beneficial for a good nights sleep, learning and memory and muscle movement. When you gain antioxidants from natural sources, like nutritious food, they work better in your body than when you take supplements because they are balanced with other nutrients.

The recommended daily dose of potassium is 4,700mg. Sweet potatoes are one of the highest vegetable sources of potassium, containing almost 500mg. Potassium is needed by the body to help nerves and muscles communicate to each other, preventing muscle cramps and contractions, and it helps transport nutrient into the cells and waste products out of them. Potassium is also important to offset the damage sodium has on blood pressure and helps to protect and to regulate the workings of the kidneys.

Vitamin C is one of the most beneficial vitamins around. It’s versatile benefits work on many areas of the body and the health system. Also known as ascorbic acid, vitamin c is naturally found in vegetables and fruits and is hugely beneficial for things like heart disease, protection against free radicals in the body, the absorption of iron and reducing cholesterol levels.

A deficiency of vitamin A can cause deterioration to the outer parts of the eye’s photoreceptors, which can damage vision. Vitamin A and vitamin E, which is also found in sweet potatoes, are wonderful for eye health and may prevent eye problems in the aging process and other degenerative damage.

Magnesium is very important for various functions of the body. It helps nerve function, regulates blood pressure, controls blood sugar; it is a neurotransmitter release, it energises the metabolism and is good for protein synthesis. Many people will be deficient in magnesium but never know it, as it does not show up on any blood test. This is because magnesium is stored in your bones, not in the blood. Sweet potatoes do not have the largest source of magnesium compared to spinach and pumpkin seeds, but they still pack a punch of magnesium benefits for the system.

A low glycemic index is not only important to people living with diabetes, but to those considered on the ‘normal’ blood sugar scale too. White potatoes have a high glycemic index, which means they have a high carbohydrate level, which converts into sugar and then corresponds to elevated blood sugar levels. In comparison, sweet potatoes are low on the glycemic index, which helps control diabetes and sugar crashes. Eating regular small amounts can help our bodies to maintain healthy blood sugar levels for people both with and without diabetes. This also helps to balance energy, fatigue and weight gain.

Beta-carotene is the orange-red pigment that is found in plants, fruits, and vegetables, especially colorful vegetables, such as sweet potato. This is a fat-soluble plant pigment. It is important to eat foods containing beta-carotene because the body converts it into Vitamin A. This means beta-carotene is not an essential nutrient, but vitamin A is. What is extraordinary about our systems is that the human body will only convert as much vitamin A as it needs to function properly. However, it needs the beta-carotene first to do so. Sweet potatoes have the highest count of beta-carotene amongst all other fruits and vegetables.

Containing absolutely zero amount of fat makes these vegetables a great food, not for weight loss alone, but they contain large amounts of fibre. Fibre is important for the digestive system and the process of foods through the body. For women, the daily intake of fibre per day is recommended at 21-25 grams for women, and 30-38 for men. The most fibre in sweet potatoes is found in the skin, up to six grams. So consider leaving the skin on next time you add sweet potatoes to a dish.

The best form of folate is folic acid, otherwise known as B9. Folate is often taken as a supplement but is also found in many foods. Folic acid is good for everyone for the growth of cells in the body. It is even more important for pregnant women in regards to the development of the fetus.

Eating sweet potatoes encourages glowing, healthy skin and collagen growth. Carotenoid rich vegetables, such as carrots, spinach, and sweet potatoes can help your skin to glow. Vegetables such as these increase the red and yellow tones in the skin, which visibly brighten complexions. You need to consume extra amounts of beta-carotene vegetables every day for around six weeks. The beta-carotene in sweet potato also combats the body’s free radicals, which encourage the aging process. So to preserve your skin and stop the aging process, consume more sweet potatoes!

brasserie cayman  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Sweet potato

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Nopal

Posted by on 30th April 2018

yaniv knobel 590649 unsplash  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Nopal

Not sure what to do with cactus pads?

It might not look it, but this prickly pear cacti is not only edible, but delicious and good for you as well. In last week’s ‘Today’s Harvest’ episode we discussed how to grow nopales. This week, it’s all about the health benefits of eating this vegetable that has a consistency somewhere between green beans and green peppers.

Native to Mexico and Central America, the nopal contains a wealth of vitamins and minerals including riboflavin, vitamin B6, copper, iron, fibre, vitamin A, vitamin C and vitamin K, calcium, potassium, magnesium and manganese. Nopal is also an important source of certain organic compounds like phytochemicals and certain polysaccharides that contribute to its health-boosting power.

Nopales are a form of cacti, so they are very fibrous. Dietary fibre is essential in the digestive process as it adds bulk to the bowel movements, which makes it easier for them to pass through the smooth muscles of the digestive tract. Furthermore, excess fibre in the body can actively reduce the amount of cholesterol, thereby protecting your heart health as well.

The phytochemical and antioxidant characteristics of nopales make them a good defensive mechanism against premature aging symptoms, like wrinkles and age spots. The free radicals left after cellular metabolism can impact the skin and by eating nopales, you can keep your skin looking healthy and young.

The variety of phytochemicals, flavonoid compounds, vitamin C and other antioxidants found in nopales make it extremely beneficial for the entire immune system, particularly when it comes to various cancers. Antioxidants are beneficial compounds that seek out free radicals and eliminate them before they mutate the DNA of healthy cells into cancerous cells.

One of the most important aspects of nopales in terms of health is their mineral and vitamin content. Nopales contain thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and and vitamin B6, all of which are vital components of cellular metabolism that regulate the enzyme activity throughout the body. A healthy organ system and hormonal balance help in losing weight easily, promoting healthy muscle gain and toning the entire body.

The mineral content of this powerful cactus leaf includes a modest level of calcium, which is an essential part of building strong bones and repairing bones after being damaged.

This plant also contains magnesium, which is a useful mineral for inducing sleep in people suffering from insomnia, chronic anxiety or restlessness. It induces the release of serotonin in the body, which results in increased melatonin levels. It also has a slightly sedative effect, which reduces nerve function and calms the body, helping you fall asleep.

The juice from the leaves of nopales has anti-inflammatory effects on various body parts, including symptoms associated with arthritis, joint pain and muscle strain. Apply the juice topically to the affected area, or consume the vegetable itself to enjoy the benefits.

Make a salad, add it to your stir-fry or omelette. However you decide to cook and eat your nopal pads, just make sure to remove the thorns first!

nopal  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Nopal

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Cilantro

Posted by on 11th April 2018

cilantro 1  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Cilantro

This versatile, bright and flavourful herb is flourishing in The Brasserie’s edible garden and popping up on our menu, giving a fresh boost of flavour without the need for added sea salt or other seasonings.

Cilantro, otherwise known as coriander, is a popular herb popular around the globe that resembles flat leaf parsley at first glance, but at first sniff, transports you to the Mediterranean, Mexico, Asia and India.

Low in saturated fat and cholesterol, cilantro is low in calories and a good source of dietary fibre, vitamins A, C, E, K, calcium, iron, potassium and magnesium.

The vitamin K and calcium content of cilantro helps to build strong bones, teeth and hair. Cilantro is considered the “anti-diabetic” plant in some parts of Europe, and research shows that it helps to lower cholesterol, lower blood pressure and supports healthy cardiovascular function.

Coriander has been used for thousands of years to treat digestive upset, gas, fungal and bacterial infections and to prevent food poisoning. Some studies show that it can help to lower blood sugar and even kill parasites in the digestive tract.

A recent study found that cilantro can protect against oxidative stress, through its high antioxidant effects. Oxidative stress is linked to a wide array of degenerative diseases including some types of cancer, heart disease, arthritis, Alzheimer’s Disease and macular degeneration.

Cilantro benefits your sleep cycle naturally and calms nerves, and can improve sleep quality through its natural sedative effects.

Used throughout the world for thousands of years to settle nauseous tummies, cilantro can prevent gas and bloating, relieve indigestion and heartburn and ease stomach cramps. It aids in efficient digestion, by helping to produce digestive enzymes that aid in the breakdown of foods. In many cuisines, fresh cilantro accompanies hot and spicy dishes because of its cooling effects.

Cilantro benefits not only detox the body but also protect it from infection and toxins. Its natural antibacterial properties helps to protect against both food and water borne diseases including food poisoning, dysentery, salmonella, cholera and particularly listeria. Research published in the International Journal of Food Microbiology studied dill, coriander and eucalyptus and found that cilantro was particularly effective in fighting listeria.

Cilantro is used both internally and externally as a remedy for skin irritations including hives, sunburns and poison ivy. It’s natural anti-histamines helps to calm the immune system response against allergens. Fresh cilantro and coconut oil can be blended together and applied to soothe sunburns, dry skin, poison ivy and hives caused by an allergic reaction.

In summary, cilantro has numerous health benefits and tastes best when picked straight from garden-to-mouth!

mariana medvedeva 561531 unsplash  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Cilantro

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Hemp seeds

Posted by on 3rd April 2018


Hemp hearts – the perfect nickname for the nutritious hemp seed with its mild, nutty flavour, that is technically a nut.

Hemp seeds contain over 30 per cent fat. They are exceptionally rich in two essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (omega-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3). This 3:1 ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 may benefit skin diseases and provide relief from eczema and dry skin and reduce itchiness and potentially the need for skin medication.

Hemp seeds are also a great source of arginine and gamma-linolenic acid, which have been linked with a reduced risk of heart disease.

Hemp hearts are a great protein source, as more than 25 per cent of their total calories are from high-quality protein. That is considerably more than similar foods like chia seeds and flaxseeds, which provide about 16–18 per cent.

Rich in vitamin E and minerals such as phosphorus, potassium, sodium, magnesium, sulfur, calcium, iron and zinc, whole hemp seeds also contain high amounts of fibre, both soluble and insoluble, which benefits digestive health. De-hulled hemp seeds have had the fibre-rich shell removed, and therefore contain very little fibre.

Hemp seeds can be consumed raw, cooked or roasted. Hemp seed oil is also very healthy, and has been used as a food/medicine in China for at least 3,000 years.

Overall, hemp seeds are incredibly good for you. They might just be one of the few superfoods that are actually worthy of their reputation.

Pop over to Juiced @ The Wicket for our $5 ‘Hearty Hemp’ smoothie special this week and find out for yourself what all the fuss is about!