Tag: event

Earth Day is every day at The Brasserie

Posted by on 20th April 2017

Tomorrow we will officially celebrate Earth Day.

Earth Day is an annual event marked across the world to show support for environmental protection.

The aim is to encourage people to do things that will benefit the Earth, such as recycling more and reducing food waste, using solar power and planting trees.

The edible garden that surrounds The Brasserie is just one example of our consistent endeavors to reduce food miles and, as a result, the fuel consumption required to carry food ‘from paddock to plate’. Our head gardener, Aide, uses the vegetable waste from the kitchen to feed The Brasserie’s “Chateau Chooks”. The egg shells she adds to the compost (along with the remaining vegetable scraps) and on the garden beds to control snails, in addition our chicken manure that is a very effective fertilizer.

The next time you get lunch from The Market, take a closer look at the plates, utensils and takeaway cups – all made from plants and 100% recyclable.

Venturing into The Brasserie’s kitchen you will see excess herbs from the garden hung to dry, trimmings go into stocks, breadcrumbs made from bread not sold after service, vinegars made from excess tomatoes and coconut water used as a brining liquid. Coconut shells are used as fodder for the caboose fire and smoker and the ashes are added to the garden compost. Stems and excess fruit are fermented, preserved and pickled to add dimension to dishes. For example, fermented Barbados gooseberries are used in the Hoisin sauce served at the Harvest Dinner. In fact, the team are currently creating a “preserving pantry”.

To celebrate all the sustainable and environmentally-friendly initiatives happening around the world, today we are offering complimentary bags of soil and coffee grounds piled high in our lovely red wheelbarrow outside the front of The Market. We will also be selling Cayman mutton pepper seedlings for $1 each and free drip coffee to anyone that brings in their own coffee mug for the day.

Earth Day is every day at The Brasserie.

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Cupuaçu

Posted by on 18th April 2017

How would you pronounce cupuaçu?

Cupuaçu is a “super fruit” that comes from South America and is extremely potent with antioxidants and other powerful nutrients.

It is the size of a medium watermelon, is related to the cocoa bean and has a name that is ineligible for trademark despite several attempts.

The creamy white or buttery yellow pulp at the centre of the large melon-shaped fruit has been a primary food source for natives in the rainforest for centuries. They become ripe from January to April during the rainy season. The large, oblong-shaped fruit with a hard outer brown shell can weigh from 2 to 4 pounds.

After falling from the tree, cupuaçu are gathered, split open, and the pulp is made into juice, ice cream and jam. The pulp contains a handful (20-30) grape-sized oval brown seeds. These can be pressed to make cupuaçu butter, rich in phytosterols and fatty acids that contain high moisturising and antioxidant properties to rejuvenate and make the skin more supple and hair more lustrous, while the vitamins along with the fatty acids protect against cardiovascular disease, memory lost, and mood swings.

Those who have eaten cupuaçu say it has a sweet fragrant aroma, a powerful indicator of the fruit’s ripeness. The moment you split the shell open your senses fill with the tropical aroma of pineapple and pears, banana and even grapefruit. The pulp has the richness of chocolate with the sweet flavours of pears, pineapple and banana.

Cupuaçu, the national fruit of Brazil, boosts energy levels but does not contain caffeine. It is one of the few cocoa relatives that does not.

There are many health benefits to cupuaçu, most of which are tied to the fruit’s extremely potent phytonutrient polyphenols and antioxidants and essential nutrients and vitamins, which are known to boost the gastro-intestinal system; in fact the inhabitants of the rain forest use it for that purpose.

This fruit offers an ample supply of vitamin B1, B2, Niacin, vitamins A and C. Being from the cocoa family, cupuaçu also has a high flavonoid content.

Its primary health benefit is stimulating the immune system while simultaneously supporting the body’s ability to fight disease.

Another huge benefit of the fruit is its extremely rich array and concentration of antioxidants. These have a large number of longer-term effects on the body including (and possibly most importantly) the neutralization of free radicals in the body’s tissues. The improved circulation and lowered cholesterol and blood pressure aid in this process of eliminating those free radicals.

To top if off, the shell of the cupuaçu fruit can be used for energy production due to its timber like characteristics.

It’s no wonder that its name is translated as ‘food for the gods’.

Oh and the pronunciation of cupuaçu is “koo-poo-wa-soo”.

JUICED @ THE WICKET CUPUAÇU BOWL

Ingredients

½ cup cupuaçu pulp
½ a small banana
2 strawberries
2 small pieces of pineapple
a splash of agave nectar

Method

Blend all ingredients together until smooth. Top with granola, coconut shavings, bee pollen, hemp seeds and banana and strawberries. Enjoy.

April in Cricket Square

Posted by on 5th April 2017

Spring has Sprung at Cricket Square

Cocktail King Dinner: 7pm, Friday 28 April

Shake, rattle and roll! Cocktail extraordinaire Gregory Genias, aka “Bootleg Greg“, will be shaking up a storm at our Cocktail Extravaganza with Brasserie Purveyors’ spirits at the Restaurant. Enjoy a welcome cocktail and canapés on arrival, followed by a four course cocktail-paired dinner for CI$100 (incl. grats). For an entertaining evening book here.

Final Harvest Dinner for this series

Don’t miss our last Harvest Dinner until November! Join us at 7pm on Thursday 27 April for this unique farm-to-table experience where our talented chefs from Mexico will be adding their unique home town flavours to the best of our end of season harvest. Enjoy with wine pairings for CI$90 (incl. grats). Hurry and book your seat at the table.

End of series Cooking Class

Our final Cooking Class for the series is on Sunday 30 April. Learn tips and tricks in the kitchen with our experienced chefs Dean Max and Thomas Tennant. Create your own flavoursome three-course feast using fresh and seasonal produce. Our March class sold out quickly so book early to avoid disappointment. Classes will resume October 2017.

Easter sweet treats at The Market

Our Pastry Chef’s Easter treats will be sold at The Market from Monday 10 – Thursday 13 April. Enjoy mouthwatering Hot Cross Buns, Easter Sugar Cookies and Peanut Butter Cup Truffles. The RestaurantMarket and Juiced@ The Wicket will be closed on Good Friday (14 April) and Easter Monday (17 April). We are open on Tuesday 18 April.

SWIRL: 5-7pm, Thursday 20 April

Dijon mustard, beef bourguignon and Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes. How many culinary delights can one region be famous for? The French region of Burgundy can proudly claim all. Burgundy wines are believed to be some of the greatest in the world, so join us to find out what all the fuss is about. SWIRL tickets are CI$30 (incl. grats). Email Corey to book.

Free juice at Juiced @ The Wicket

Buy 10 juices or smoothies from our delicious menu and get one FREE. Collect your Juiced @ card from Sharon at The Wicket and reward yourself with a healthy and delicious treat from our extensive menu that incorporates the freshest seasonal produce on island. In a hurry? Call 927 6419 and order ahead.

Earth Day: Saturday 22 April

Bring your reusable travel mug to The Market for FREE drip coffee all day. While you’re there grab a bag of coffee grounds from our wheelbarrow to add to your garden soil. The coffee will release nitrogen, potassium and phosphorous to support plant growth. Also collect some of our mutton pepper seedlings and together, let’s bring back the Cayman pepper!

Power Pilates Bootcamp at Energy

Get ready for eight total body blasting Pilates Reformer classes and four Group Fitness classes for $225. Choose from Group A (Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30-7:15am) or Group B (Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1-1:45pm). ENERGY’s next Power Pilates Bootcamp starts on Tuesday 4 April and runs for four weeks. Contact Colleen to register.

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Tomato

Posted by on 5th April 2017

Tomato Salad 1  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Tomato

There is so much to talk about when it comes to tomatoes. Are they a fruit or a vegetable? Why do some people not enjoy eating raw tomato but love it when cooked? Should we store tomatoes in the fridge or at room temperature?

To begin, tomatoes originated in the South American Andes around the area of modern day Peru and were first used as a food by the Aztec’s in Southern Mexico.

Scientifically speaking, a tomato is a fruit. True fruits are developed from the ovary in the base of the flower, and contain the seeds of the plant. Blueberries, raspberries, and oranges are true fruits, and so are many kinds of nuts. As far as cooking is concerned, tomatoes are often called a vegetable because they are used in savoury rather than sweet cooking.

Certain key taste receptors are responsible for preventing some people from appreciating the rich, sweet, meaty flavour of raw tomatoes that others adore. Tomatoes have something on the order of 400 volatile compounds and who knows which one of those (or combination thereof) might be responsible for the harsh reaction some experience in response to raw tomatoes.

While cooking tomatoes for just two minutes may decrease their vitamin C content by 10 per cent, whether you roast them slowly or make a cooked sauce, this also helps to break down the plant cell walls allowing us to better absorb the antioxidant lycopene. All these nutrients help to safeguard our cells from environmental damage, may protect us from certain cancers and are heart-friendly.

Tomatoes are rich in vitamin A and vitamin C. These vitamins, also called antioxidants, are known to fight off the effects of free radicals, known to cause cell damage in the body.

Tomatoes are an excellent food for aiding in vision improvement due to their high concentration of vitamin A. Tomatoes also contain a high amount of chromium, which has been proven to be helpful in controlling your body’s blood sugar level.

The presence of potassium and vitamin B help to lower high cholesterol levels and blood pressure. This can aid in the prevention of heart attacks and strokes.

Store fruits like tomatoes at room temperature rather than in the fridge to optimise the ripening process and increases the levels of that valuable lycopene.

The Brasserie’s Head Gardener Aidé Davila has been busy harvesting tomatoes from our garden for Chef Thomas to create this deliciously fresh tomato salad (pictured above) that currently features on the Restaurant menu.

CAYMAN TOMATO SALAD
Serves 6

Ingredients

Black Garlic Vinaigrette:
5 cloves black garlic
1 tablespoon thyme, finely chopped
1 shallot, finely chopped
½ cup balsamic vinegar
1 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon kosher salt

Balsamic Reduction:
1 cup balsamic vinegar

For the salad:
1 pound local slicing tomatoes, sliced into wedges
1 pound local cherry tomatoes, cut in half
½ pound arugula
½ cup basil leaves
3 burrata mozzarellas
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
Cayman sea salt
fresh ground pepper

Method

In a small sauce pot set over medium high heat, bring to a simmer then reduce the heat to low. Carefully reduce the vinegar for about 10-15 minutes. Be careful as it will burn easily. When it is able to coat a spoon, then it should be thick enough to use. Remove from the heat and allow to cool before pouring into a container.

Gently toss the tomatoes, basil and arugula with ½ cup of the black garlic vinaigrette, season with salt and pepper. Divide the salad between 6 plates. Cut the burrata in half and place on half of each burrata on the salad. Season liberally with Cayman sea salt, fresh ground black pepper and olive oil. Carefully drizzle the balsamic reduction on the plate.

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Breadfruit

Posted by on 20th March 2017

Have you ever wondered what the inside of a breadfruit looks like? The image above was taken during our last cooking class at The Brasserie when we were learning how to make deliciously satisfying breadfruit chips.

This dimply bright green orb the size of a cantaloupe has always created interest and intrigue. Why now for a breadfruit comeback? It’s high in fibre, antioxidants, calcium, iron and potassium.

The other great news is that you can eat breadfruit at any stage. When it’s small and green, it tastes like an artichoke. When it’s starchy and mature, breadfruit is the equivalent of a potato. When it’s soft and ripe, it’s dessert.

A traditional staple in Hawaii, breadfruit is sometimes called the tree potato, for its potato-like consistency when cooked. Except breadfruit has higher-quality protein and packs a healthy dose of vitamins and minerals.

That’s why this nutrient-rich staple is being cultivated for poorer, tropical parts of the world, giving us even more reasons to consider breadfruit as a superfood. The fast-growing perennial trees require far less labour, fertiliser and pesticides than crops like rice and wheat. They’re also more productive. A single tree yields an average of 250 fruits a year and can bear an abundance of fruit for decades.

Breadfruit grows on tall trees in tropical areas like Hawaii, Samoa, and the Caribbean. It’s high in energy from carbohydrates, low in fat and has more potassium than 10 bananas.

This fruit is an immune booster and is rich in amino acids that are essential to keeping our bodies fueled and functioning properly. It’s loaded with bioflavonoids, which fight inflammation, and contains high levels of thiamine to support digestive health.

So the next time you see breadfruit on our menu, enjoy this superfood, knowing that it is providing your body with plenty of nourishment.

CHEF THOMAS’ FAMOUS BREADFRUIT SALAD
8 servings

Ingredients

2 breadfruit
½ cup seasoning pepper aioli
3 green onions, trimmed, washed, thinly sliced
3 local bell peppers, diced
1 scotch bonnet, seeds removed, minced
4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
½ cup sour cream
3 tablespoons kosher salt
1 tablespoon black pepper
kosher salt
5 beets, trimmed of any tops

Method

Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Cut the top of the breadfruit off and score the bottom with an “x”. Roast on a sheet pan for about 35-45 minutes or until you can insert a knife easily into the centre. Once cooked remove from the oven and allow to cool. Peel the skin by cutting with a knife. Dice the breadfruit into 1 inch cubes. Combine the aioli, green onion, peppers, scotch bonnet, vinegar, sour cream, salt and pepper in a mixing bowl and whisk until combined. Stir in the breadfruit. Season to taste. Meanwhile, pour about 1 cup of kosher salt into a baking dish and place the beet on the salt. Roast in the oven at 350 degrees until cooked though. Allow to cool and peel. Slice thinly and reserve for plating.