Tag: food waste

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Celery

Posted by on 26th June 2017

DSC 0279  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Celery

Anyone for “crunchy water”?

Kale and blueberries walk away with most health accolades. In comparison, celery is the somewhat unsung hero, but once you read its incredible–and nearly endless–list of health benefits you will quickly join its growing list of lovers.

Firstly, save on the chewing gum and grab a celery stalk! Did you know that nibbling celery stalks helps to clean your teeth and mouth after a meal?

Celery also provides dietary fibre that boosts digestion and weight loss. One large stalk contains only 10 calories! So, add celery to your shopping list and enjoy it in our mouth-watering salad recipe below.

The high percentage of water and electrolytes found in celery can prevent dehydration, especially over these hot summer months. Special compounds act as a diuretic and reduce bloating.

As a supplier of antioxidant flavonoids and polyphenol phytonutrients, other significant benefits of celery include its ability to improve liver, skin, eye and cognitive health. One large stalk of celery delivers five per cent of your daily vitamin A needs, a group of nutrients that protects the eyes and prevents age-related degeneration of vision.

Celery contains antioxidants and polysaccharides that are known to act as anti-inflammatories, especially flavonoid and polyphenol antioxidants. If you are suffering from joint pains, lung infections, asthma or acne, eating more celery will bring much-needed relief.

Stressed and anxious? The minerals in celery, especially magnesium and the essential oil in it, soothe the nervous system and assist to calm you down. If you enjoy a celery-based snack in the evening, you may even sleep better.

Celery reduces “bad” cholesterol and lowers blood pressure. An active compound called phthalides in celery has been proven to boost circulatory health.

And don’t be scared of using the leaves of the celery stalk. Just like Chef Arte has done in our featured Brasserie salad this week (pictured above, recipe below), celery leaves not only taste delicious but add an aesthetic frill to attract any celery critic.

If you’re still hesitant to give celery a go, present your Mum with a bunch of celery, just like the winners of athletic events in Ancient Greece were presented with instead of flowers. A practical gift that won’t break the budget.

BRASSERIE CHOPPED SALAD

Ingredients

For the salad:

local mixed greens
Château Chooks hard boiled eggs
long beans
watermelon radish
chickpeas
celery, stalk and leaves
bell peppers
flax seeds

For the dressing:

parsely
mint
basil
dill
grape seed oil
Dijon mustard
champagne vinegar
lemon aioli
salt
pepper

Method

Combine all salad ingredients together. Blend dressing ingredients and drizzle over salad before serving.

World Oceans Day

Posted by on 7th June 2017

What does the ocean mean to you?

In Cayman, the Caribbean Sea is a prime food source and a place to learn about and enjoy our diverse marine life.

However, did you know that invasive lionfish are out-breeding, out-competing and out-living native fish stocks and other marine species? The consequences are impacting food security and economies affecting over a hundred million people.

Introducing CULL, Cayman United Lionfish League. Our on-site Executive Chef at The Brasserie, Thomas Tennant, is one of the founding members behind this conservation effort to protect Cayman’s reefs and marine life.

“Lionfish are disrupting the food chain. They eat the marine ecosystem that clean the reef and if the reef is not cleaned, algae and bacteria start to build up which decreases coral growth rates,” says Thomas.

“The fish we love to eat, like snapper and triggerfish, are reliant on the reefs for protection to grow. If the reefs are no longer there, the fish have no protection and fish stocks are reduced.”

Data collected is showing that lionfish will eat anything that they can fit into their mouths. Their stomach can expand up to 30 times the normal volume and a lionfish will fill it up to capacity as soon as it is able. Scientists have catalogued over 70 different species that lionfish will eat through stomach content analysis. In addition to the fish they eat, they also eat invertebrates and molluscs – shrimp, crabs, juvenile octopus, squid and juvenile lobster, for example.

Lionfish are not native to Caribbean waters (they are native to the Indo-Pacific oceans and the Red Sea), so they have very few predators, yet they themselves are voracious predators. Pretty much everything about the lionfish – its red and white zebra stripes, long, showy pectoral fins and generally cantankerous demeanor – says, “Don’t touch!”

“We’d love to find a natural predator for the lionfish. In the meantime, we need to lead by example, encourage local divers to follow suit, and increase the education and awareness of the detrimental impact that lionfish are having on marine life. The coastal waters around the islands are our backyard and we need to focus on mowing our own lawn,” Thomas explains.

“If you have a licence to spear, hunt lionfish on your next dive and sell them to a local restaurant like The Brasserie. The demand is there. People enjoy eating lionfish and as long as the fish are fresh, I’ll take them.

“Just remember to buy and eat local lionfish to support the health of our local reef systems. Restaurants now have the option of importing lionfish, but in order to make a difference locally, we need to be sourcing and eating local lionfish.”

Thomas is one of several chefs on island who is incorporating lionfish into the menu. So, enjoy eating lionfish at The Brasserie Restaurant knowing the conservation effort behind this dish and the low food miles that it took to get to the plate.

Please contact the restaurant with your lion fish catch on 945 1815.

Another inspiring local initiative is the Cayman Swordfish tag and release program that is “single-handedly becoming responsible for more satellite tagging data and science on the swordfish than anywhere else in the world,” according to Gray FishTag research scientist Travis “Tag” Moore.

“The data indicates peak seasons for when the swordfish are in the Cayman waters. The data shows feeding behaviour and the vertical migration patterns. The data can indicate how long swordfish stay around the islands and which islands they stay around the most.

“This information is important to help protect Cayman’s exclusive fishery against international rogue fishing fleets by establishing scientific evidence for international authorities that illustrate these fish are in the Cayman waters for certain time periods.”

How do you intend to celebrate World Oceans Day?

Earth Day is every day at The Brasserie

Posted by on 20th April 2017

DSC 7804 3 e1488420224616  Earth Day is every day at The Brasserie

Tomorrow we will officially celebrate Earth Day.

Earth Day is an annual event marked across the world to show support for environmental protection.

The aim is to encourage people to do things that will benefit the Earth, such as recycling more and reducing food waste, using solar power and planting trees.

The edible garden that surrounds The Brasserie is just one example of our consistent endeavors to reduce food miles and, as a result, the fuel consumption required to carry food ‘from paddock to plate’. Our head gardener, Aide, uses the vegetable waste from the kitchen to feed The Brasserie’s “Chateau Chooks”. The egg shells she adds to the compost (along with the remaining vegetable scraps) and on the garden beds to control snails, in addition our chicken manure that is a very effective fertilizer.

The next time you get lunch from The Market, take a closer look at the plates, utensils and takeaway cups – all made from plants and 100% recyclable.

Venturing into The Brasserie’s kitchen you will see excess herbs from the garden hung to dry, trimmings go into stocks, breadcrumbs made from bread not sold after service, vinegars made from excess tomatoes and coconut water used as a brining liquid. Coconut shells are used as fodder for the caboose fire and smoker and the ashes are added to the garden compost. Stems and excess fruit are fermented, preserved and pickled to add dimension to dishes. For example, fermented Barbados gooseberries are used in the Hoisin sauce served at the Harvest Dinner. In fact, the team are currently creating a “preserving pantry”.

To celebrate all the sustainable and environmentally-friendly initiatives happening around the world, today we are offering complimentary bags of soil and coffee grounds piled high in our lovely red wheelbarrow outside the front of The Market. We will also be selling Cayman mutton pepper seedlings for $1 each and free drip coffee to anyone that brings in their own coffee mug for the day.

Earth Day is every day at The Brasserie.