Tag: recipe

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Sorrel

Posted by on 8th December 2017

Sorrel hand  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Sorrel

Sorrel is a fascinating and festive perennial herb growing in Cricket Square’s edible gardens as we head towards Christmas.

It’s used all around the world and is cultivated for a wide variety of uses, although primarily as food with its sharp, tangy taste reminiscent of wild strawberries or kiwi thanks to the oxalic acid component found in the leaves.

The health benefits of sorrel include its ability to boost eyesight, reduce certain skin infections, strengthen the immune system, improve digestion, build strong bones, increase circulation, increase energy levels, lower blood pressure, increase appetite, protect against diabetes, strengthen heart health and improve the kidney health.

The high content of dietary fibre that can be found in most varieties of sorrel allows food to move through the digestive system, improving your gastrointestinal health and reducing conditions like constipation, diarrhea, bloating and cramping, as well as gastrointestinal issues. Dietary fibre can also help to reduce total cholesterol in the body, thereby protecting heart health.

Sorrel is rich in potassium, which is an essential mineral for human health. Potassium is a vasodilator, as well as is instrumental in maintaining fluid balance throughout the body. This means that potassium reduces the stress on the cardiovascular system by relaxing the blood vessels and arteries. Lowered blood pressure reduces the chances of dangerous blood clotting and excessive strain on the heart that can lead to coronary heart disease and other complications.

Although the studies looking into the antioxidant components of sorrel are still ongoing, there is a good evidence that it contains polyphenolic compounds, flavonoids, and anthocyanins, all of which function as antioxidants in the human body. The wealth of antioxidants that sorrel contains means that it is very effective at seeking out free radicals in the body and neutralising them.

Vitamin A, another of the essential vitamins found in sorrel, can improve eyesight and reduce macular degeneration and cataracts. Beta-carotene, which is a derivative of vitamin A, acts as an antioxidant, and combined with the other important antioxidant compounds in the body, it can greatly boost eye health and prevent age-related degradation.

Significant iron levels in sorrel mean that it boosts the red blood cell production and prevents anemia (iron deficiency). Increased circulation boosts oxygen levels throughout the body in the vital organs, boosts hair growth, increases energy levels, and speeds up the healing process (in conjunction with the protein content of sorrel).

Sorrel’s vitamin C content is impressive and can stimulate the immune system and increase the white blood cell count in the body, which is the first line of defense against pathogens and other foreign invaders in the body.

Our Sorrel Martini is available at The Brasserie, so now you have every reason to enjoy this festive drink.

Sorrel  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Sorrel

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Almonds

Posted by on 4th December 2017

They’re a waistline-friendly snack known to boost heart health, but before you get carried away with a heaping handful, consider a few of the lesser-known facts about this beneficial bite.

Rather than a nut, the almond is actually the seed of a fruit that grows on an almond tree. The fruit of the almond is called a drupe. The fuzzy hull around the almond seed feels like a peach and that’s because peaches and apricots are family members of the almond. The outer hull is not consumed by humans and instead, used as a cattle feed all over the world.

Did you also know that the almond is a member of the rose family and is often called “the queen of the rose family”?

Almonds are reliant on bees for crop pollination. No bees, no almonds. There are around 30 varieties of almonds, but only 10 undergo production for consumption purposes.

The immature green almond can be preserved and pickled — some consider it a delicacy.

Recent sudies show almonds eaten mid-morning can help moderate your blood sugar throughout the day. Almonds are extremely high in magnesium, a mineral that most people don’t get enough of. High magnesium intake may have major benefits for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

Low magnesium levels are strongly linked to high blood pressure, indicating that almonds can be beneficial for blood pressure control. Eating 1-2 handfuls of almonds per day can lead to mild reductions in LDL cholesterol levels.

Almonds are high in healthy monounsaturated fats, are a rich source of calcium, magnesium, vitamin E, dietary fibres, and vitamin B and are the biggest barrier against cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.

Almonds are high in antioxidants that can protect your cells from oxidative damage, a major contributor to ageing and disease.

Nuts are low in carbs, but high in protein and fibre. Studies show that eating almonds (and other nuts) can increase satiety and help you eat fewer calories.

Did you know that chocolate manufacturers use around 40 percent of world’s total almonds in making delicious and mouth-watering chocolates?

Raw almonds are among the lowest-calorie nut and guess what? It’s easy to make your own almond milk. The same milk that we are using in this week’s $5 ‘Peaches & Cream’ Juiced @ The Wicket special. The process essentially involves soaking almonds in water overnight or for up to two days — the longer you soak the almonds, the creamier the milk will be. Drain and rinse the nuts from their soaking water and grind them with fresh water. The resulting liquid, drained from the almond meal, is almond milk.

Real, fresh, very tasty almond milk is a game-changer!

DSC 1881  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Almonds

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Carob

Posted by on 21st November 2017

carob  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Carob

Did you know that carob pod husks are chewed by singers to clear the voice and throat?

Made from dried, roasted carob tree pods, carob powder is a sweet and healthy substitute for chocolate.

The carob tree, or Ceratonia siliqua, has fruit that looks like a dark brown pea pod, which carries pulp and seeds. Carob can boost the immune system, reduce the risk of cancer, improve digestion, slow down aging, prevent cardiovascular diseases, and help prevent and manage diabetes.

Carob tannins contain Gallic acid that works as an analgesic, anti-allergic, antibacterial, antioxidant, antiviral and antiseptic. The tannins found in carobs can increase the effectiveness of certain substances (enzymes) that help to regulate the digestion process.  Additionally, carob provides powerful anti-viral benefits that supply the body with essential antioxidants. Foods rich in tannins are often recommended for treatment of diarrhea as it reduces acid production and combats related ailments.

Experts say carobs contain fibre that naturally helps to regulate blood sugar levels (useful for people who suffer from diabetes). As an insoluble fibre product (which contains pinitol, a type of inositol), carob helps water bind in the digestive tract, which enhances the health of the intestinal tract and regulates blood glucose.

Due to the high percentage of insoluble fibre contained in carobs, research shows carobs have the potential to lower cholesterol levels. Carobs have naturally high levels of lignin and polyphenols, which are powerful antioxidants.

In a clinical trial conducted in the US, consumption of a carob pulp preparation decreased postprandial responses of acylated ghrelin, triglycerides, suggesting a change toward increased fatty acid oxidation. In other words, carob fibre might exert beneficial effects in energy intake, and thus, reduce body weight.

Carob is high in phosphorus and calcium, which means it may help in the fight against osteoporosis ailment. It has also been recommended for children who have had polio ailment, due to the high levels of calcium and gallic acid.

As carobs are rich in vitamin E, and full of antioxidants and phytonutrients, they have, on occasion, been suggested in aid of the treatment of anemia, coughs, osteoclasis, colds and influenza.

Enjoy our $5 Juiced @ The Wicket ‘Carob Delight’ this week, guilt-free, knowing that this fibre-rich ingredient, high in antioxidants and low in sodium and fat, is a superfood that all chocoholics will love.

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Tuna

Posted by on 15th November 2017

tuna steak  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Tuna

Each day The Brasserie’s fishing boats, Brasserie Catch I and Brasserie Catch II, deliver fresh sustainably-caught fish to the Restaurant to be served on the menu just hours later, including this mouthwatering yellowfin tuna fillet.

And if you’re a guest at our first Harvest Dinner of the season on Thursday, you are in luck! Yellowfin tuna is one our hero ingredients that you will have the opportunity to enjoy, paired with garden vegetables and a speciality wine carefully selected by our sommelier.

Did you know that tuna are some of the fastest swimmers in the ocean with burst speeds recorded at around 45 kilometres per hour?

Not only is this impressive, but the vitamin, mineral and nutrient content, as well as other organic compounds found in this large fish are significant. These include antioxidants and protein, without much-saturated fat or sodium. It also has impressive levels of selenium and good amounts of phosphorous, iron, magnesium and potassium. In terms of vitamins, there is a wealth of vitamin B12 and niacin, as well as a good amount of vitamin B6 and riboflavin.

The health benefits help growth and development, lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, assist weight loss, boost the immune system, increase energy, maintain skin health and reduce inflammation.

The combination of omega-3 fatty acids, which are anti-inflammatory and can help reduce blood pressure, along with potassium,  make tuna fish very good for lowering blood pressure. Reducing hypertension can significantly boost your health by lowering the strain on your cardiovascular system. This can prevent heart attacks and stroke.

Luckily, for pescatarians, tuna fish is packed with protein. A single serving of only 165 grams (approximately 1 can of tuna fish) contains more than 80 per cent of your daily protein requirement. Proteins are the building blocks of our body, and with proper amounts of protein in our system, we are guaranteed to have increased growth and development, faster recovery from wounds and illnesses, improved muscle tone and growth, and overall metabolic efficiency. It can boost our energy levels and make our body work more effectively.

Tuna also contains good amounts of vitamin C, zine and manganese, all of which are considered antioxidant in nature. Antioxidants are one of the body’s defines mechanisms against free radicals. However the real champion of tuna’s immune system-boosting potential is selenium.

The B complex of vitamins has been connected with a wide range of different health aspects, but as a whole, they are mainly involved in improving the metabolism and increasing the efficiency of our organ systems, while also protecting the skin and increasing energy.

Don’t forget to keep an eye on The Brasserie’s Facebook page for updates on our daily catch, and join us this Thursday for our first Harvest Dinner of the season.

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Conch

Posted by on 7th November 2017

conch  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Conch

Look at that beloved Caribbean mollusk, the queen conch (pronounced “konk”).

The large marine snail—technically a gastropod mollusk—represents a huge part of Cayman culture. Their gorgeous pink spiral shells are widely found on our beaches. The fleshy, chewy meat is sliced and diced into fritters, salads, chowder, burgers, pasta, and handheld patties; it’s battered and deep-fried; it’s even scored (“scorched”) and eaten raw.

Conch ceviche (pictured below) is now featuring on The Brasserie menu, coinciding with the start of Cayman’s conch season on 1 November 2017.

For 65 million years, conchs have dwelled in the warm, mostly shallow waters of our planet. Their habitat of choice is just one factor contributing to their currently dwindling numbers—pollution has led to the degradation of their preferred seagrass beds, and shallow waters, where juveniles in particular cluster, are all too easy for humans to infiltrate. One estimate suggests that out of 400,000 offspring, fewer than one conch will survive into adulthood. This alarming statistic, coupled with other environmental and human pressures, signals a worrying time for the queen conch.

The Cayman Islands’ Department of Environment conducts an annual conch survey to monitor the success of marine parks and replenishment zones in stabilising existing populations. In addition, they continue to recommend a reduction in legal catch limits to supplement their efforts and help protect the queen conch for future generations. As mentioned above, conch season is closed 1 May through 31 October, with a catch limit of five per person or ten per boat per day, whichever is less.

Conch has a high nutritional value, making it one of our local superfoods. Conch is a good source of protein, but it also supplies a wealth of key vitamins and minerals including iron, vitamin B12, selenium folate and vitamin E, as well as being low in fat and carbohydrates.

The calcinated conch shell of Turbinella pyrum consists of calcium, iron and magnesium. It is well known in Ayurvedic medicine for its antacid and digestive properties.

Did you know that blowing conch shells is said to exercise the thyroid glands and vocal cords, thus acting as a natural solution to speech issues, including stammering problems? It’s also believed that blowing conch shells can be great exercise for the facial muscles and reduce wrinkles. And if you want to achieve that flawless glow, massage your face with water from a conch shell!

Click here for our mouthwatering farm-to-table Brasserie menus that include Chef Artemio’s delicious conch ceviche, only available until 30 April and the duration of Cayman’s conch season.

DSC 1697  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Conch