Tag: The Brasserie

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Spirulina

Posted by on 21st June 2017

DSC 0167  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Spirulina

What is spirulina? A herb? A green leafy vegetable? One of the most nutrient-rich foods on earth?

Spirulina belongs to the bacteria kingdom, not the plant kingdom. Although widely called blue-green algae, it’s a cyanobacteria (meaning blue bacteria) and is partly responsible for producing the oxygen in the planet’s atmosphere. Spirulina grows naturally in the wild in warm, fresh water lakes and is also cultivated and harvested in man-made reservoirs.

Spirulina has between 55 and 70 per cent protein (more than beef, chicken, and soybeans), eight essential and 10 non-essential amino acids, as well as high levels of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), beta-carotene, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, vitamin B12, iron, calcium, phosphorus, nucleic acids RNA and DNA, chlorophyll, and phycocyanin, a pigment-protein complex that is found only in blue-green algae.

This vibrant ingredient provides a wide range of health benefits including an energy boost and reduced fatigue. It helps improve the immune system, and provides exceptional support for the heart, liver, and kidneys. Spirulina is also a natural detoxifier, oxygenating the blood, and helping cleanse the body of toxins and other impurities that may be causing illnesses or other health complications.

Spirulina is also a natural appetite suppressant and helps to improve the body’s digestive system. It contains powerful antioxidant properties to balance the body’s pH, thereby reducing inflammation throughout the body, as well as improve your immune system and brain function.

And there’s even more good news! Whether you freeze it, refrigerate it, leave it at room temperature, or process it, you will still get all of its nutrients.

JUICED @ THE WICKET GREEN BOWL

Ingredients

avocado
banana
spinach
pineapple
maca
spirulina
almond milk
hemp seed
coconut
bee pollen

Method

Blend spinach, avocado, pineapple, banana, maca, spirulina and almond milk until smooth. Sprinkle hemp seed, coconut and bee pollen on top and add sliced banana and pineapple. Enjoy!

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Beetroot

Posted by on 12th June 2017

DSC 0074  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Beetroot

Beetroot’s deep, overpoweringly red juice has earned it the reputation as the bossiest of vegetables. It’s much-deserved place at the centre stage of a healthy diet is because these ruby gems are a goldmine of essential everyday nutrients like iron, manganese, copper, magnesium, and potassium.

Whether you blend into a classic soup, drink as juice like elite athletes or roast whole and create a delicious fulfilling salad like our ‘Garden Beet Salad’ (pictured above), beetroot is low in fat, full of vitamins and minerals and packed with powerful antioxidants – a health-food titan.

Belonging to the same family as chard and spinach both the leaves and root can be eaten, making the beetroot of exceptional nutritional value. They are an excellent source of folic acid and fibre, essential to the health and maintenance of the intestinal tract.

Beetroot is rich in nitrates and when ingested, scientists believe our body converts nitrates into nitric oxide, a chemical thought to lower blood pressure.

If ever we had a perfect food to cleanse the liver, it would be beets! Why? Because beets are extremely high in plant ‘flavonoids’ and beta-carotene. Beetroots have long been used for medicinal purposes, primarily for disorders of the liver as they help to stimulate the liver’s detoxification processes.

Need a boost to make it through your next workout? Beet juice may again prove valuable. Those who drank beet juice prior to exercise were able to exercise for up to 16 percent longer. Researchers believe beetroot juice may work to boost stamina by affecting how the body processes nitrate into nitric oxide, thereby reducing the amount of oxygen burned by the body during a workout.

Beets are a unique source of betaine, a nutrient that helps protects cells, proteins, and enzymes from environmental stress. Research also found have found that drinking juice from beetroot can improve oxygenation to the brain, slowing the progression of dementia in older adults. And let’s not forget choline, a very important and versatile nutrient in beetroot, which helps with sleep, muscle movement, learning and memory.

Beetroot’s delicious but distinctive flavour and nutritional status have escalated it to the root you can’t beat!

GARDEN BEET SALAD

Ingredients

beetroot
arugula
shaved fennel
long beans
vanilla goat cheese
seville orange and honey dressing
brasserie bee pollen

Method

Combine beetroot, arugula, shaved fennel, long beans and goat cheese. Drizzle with dressing and sprinkle with bee pollen.

World Oceans Day

Posted by on 7th June 2017

What does the ocean mean to you?

In Cayman, the Caribbean Sea is a prime food source and a place to learn about and enjoy our diverse marine life.

However, did you know that invasive lionfish are out-breeding, out-competing and out-living native fish stocks and other marine species? The consequences are impacting food security and economies affecting over a hundred million people.

Introducing CULL, Cayman United Lionfish League. Our on-site Executive Chef at The Brasserie, Thomas Tennant, is one of the founding members behind this conservation effort to protect Cayman’s reefs and marine life.

“Lionfish are disrupting the food chain. They eat the marine ecosystem that clean the reef and if the reef is not cleaned, algae and bacteria start to build up which decreases coral growth rates,” says Thomas.

“The fish we love to eat, like snapper and triggerfish, are reliant on the reefs for protection to grow. If the reefs are no longer there, the fish have no protection and fish stocks are reduced.”

Data collected is showing that lionfish will eat anything that they can fit into their mouths. Their stomach can expand up to 30 times the normal volume and a lionfish will fill it up to capacity as soon as it is able. Scientists have catalogued over 70 different species that lionfish will eat through stomach content analysis. In addition to the fish they eat, they also eat invertebrates and molluscs – shrimp, crabs, juvenile octopus, squid and juvenile lobster, for example.

Lionfish are not native to Caribbean waters (they are native to the Indo-Pacific oceans and the Red Sea), so they have very few predators, yet they themselves are voracious predators. Pretty much everything about the lionfish – its red and white zebra stripes, long, showy pectoral fins and generally cantankerous demeanor – says, “Don’t touch!”

“We’d love to find a natural predator for the lionfish. In the meantime, we need to lead by example, encourage local divers to follow suit, and increase the education and awareness of the detrimental impact that lionfish are having on marine life. The coastal waters around the islands are our backyard and we need to focus on mowing our own lawn,” Thomas explains.

“If you have a licence to spear, hunt lionfish on your next dive and sell them to a local restaurant like The Brasserie. The demand is there. People enjoy eating lionfish and as long as the fish are fresh, I’ll take them.

“Just remember to buy and eat local lionfish to support the health of our local reef systems. Restaurants now have the option of importing lionfish, but in order to make a difference locally, we need to be sourcing and eating local lionfish.”

Thomas is one of several chefs on island who is incorporating lionfish into the menu. So, enjoy eating lionfish at The Brasserie Restaurant knowing the conservation effort behind this dish and the low food miles that it took to get to the plate.

Please contact the restaurant with your lion fish catch on 945 1815.

Another inspiring local initiative is the Cayman Swordfish tag and release program that is “single-handedly becoming responsible for more satellite tagging data and science on the swordfish than anywhere else in the world,” according to Gray FishTag research scientist Travis “Tag” Moore.

“The data indicates peak seasons for when the swordfish are in the Cayman waters. The data shows feeding behaviour and the vertical migration patterns. The data can indicate how long swordfish stay around the islands and which islands they stay around the most.

“This information is important to help protect Cayman’s exclusive fishery against international rogue fishing fleets by establishing scientific evidence for international authorities that illustrate these fish are in the Cayman waters for certain time periods.”

How do you intend to celebrate World Oceans Day?

SUPERFOOD SERIES: Mango

Posted by on 5th June 2017

DSC 9930  SUPERFOOD SERIES: Mango

Ever thought of putting slices of mango on your face? What about a body scrub of mashed mango, honey and milk? It’s mango season which means that it’s time to make the most of this superfood with it’s high vitamin A content to help unclog pores and make your skin glow. Mangoes are also great for your hair because of this vitamin A, a nutrient required for sebum production that keeps hair moisturised.

Not only is vitamin A great for the skin, it also helps promote good eye sight, fights dry eyes and prevent night blindness.

In need of a mango refresher to cool you down this summer? Simply slice a mango and blend with ice and a dash of coconut water to boost your energy. Otherwise visit Sharon and Eric at Juiced @ The Wicket for our $5 ‘Mango Madness’ available for the entire month of June.

Mangoes are very low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. They are also an excellent source of dietary fibre and vitamin B6, which is vital for maintaining and improving the brain’s function.

The fibre and water content in mangoes assists in the prevention of constipation and promotes a healthy digestive tract.The fibre, potassium and vitamin content in mangoes all help to ward off heart disease. An increase in potassium intake along with a decrease in sodium intake is the most important dietary change that a person can make to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease.

Mangoes are rich in minerals like potassium, magnesium and copper and are one of the best sources of quercetin, beta-carotene, and astragalin. These powerful antioxidants have the ability to neutralise free radicals throughout the body. Ailments like heart disease, premature aging, cancer and degenerative diseases are due to these free radicals that damage the cells.

The powerful carotenoid, beta-carotene, also helps to enhance the immune system of the body and make it impervious to bacteria and toxins. The combination of vitamin C, vitamin A and 25 different kinds of carotenoids keep your immune system healthy. Beta-carotene may also lower the risk for developing asthma.

Hopefully you can now see why mangoes are one of the most popular fruits in the world!

Find sweet and juicy local Cayman mangoes throughout our entire seasonal menu at The Brasserie Market and Restaurant, like this delicious mango salad (pictured above).

CAYMAN MANGO SALAD

Ingredients

mangoes
local lettuce
java apple
basil
local pepper
macadamia nuts
housemade ricotta
spicy mango vinaigrette

Method

Combine all local and seasonal ingredients together and drizzle with the homemade vinaigrette. Enjoy!